How far apart should you plant 2 apple trees?

Plant apple trees 20 to 25 feet apart from one another. While some cultivars are self-fruitful, most require cross-pollination between two different varieties that bloom at the same time.

How far apart do you plant apple trees for pollination?

For pollination purposes, the recommended planting distance for apple trees is within a 100 foot distance. To summarize, nearly all apple varieties need to be cross-pollinated with pollen from the flowers of a different apple variety to produce fruit.

What happens if you plant apple trees too close together?

Problems. If the fruit trees do grow tall, however, close planting can cause problems. The trees create too much shade, preventing light from penetrating to the lower branches. … This can encourage the growth of fungii and reduce the production of fruit, potentially damaging or ruining the fruit harvest.

When should apple trees be planted?

When to Plant Apple Trees
  • Bare-root apple trees should be planted in the early spring as soon as the soil can be worked.
  • Container-grown apple trees can be planted throughout the growing season as long as they are given enough water.

How long does it take for an apple tree to bear fruit?

Dwarf apple trees will start bearing fruit 2 to 3 years after planting. Standard size trees can take up to 8 years to bear fruit. Some varieties are more susceptible to insect and disease damage than others. Prune annually to keep apple trees healthy and productive.

How far apart do I plant fruit trees?

Fruit tree spacing can be as close as 2 to 3 feet (61-91 cm.) apart for a hedgerow. If multi-planting, plant similar rootstocks together and trees with like spray requirements together.

How do you prepare soil for apple trees?

Fill around the tree with the soil-compost-manure-mix, then water it it, don’t pack it down! If the soil level settles down lower after watering, and more soil-compost-manure mix and rewater. Mix some seaweed extract into a watering can and water around the tree.

How many apple trees do I need?

Unless you plant a self-pollinating apple tree, you need at least two trees for proper pollination. The trees should be different cultivars that flower at the same time.

Where is the best place to plant apple trees?

Apple trees will do their best when they are planted in well-drained soil that doesn’t get too wet. They should never be planted in low-lying or wet patches; that’s a job for willows and bald cypress! An ideal location would be a northern or eastern slope, with the apple tree planted near the top in a sunny location.

How many apple trees can you plant per acre?

Though in many European orchards the number of trees per acre is set at 5,000 trees or more, in the US the apple tree density starts at 450-485 trees per acre with a maximum of 1,100 trees/acre. This is a recommended number for the dwarf apple trees. The tree density for normal size apple trees is 60 to 80 per acre.

Should fruit trees be planted in pairs?

Do you have to plant fruit trees in pairs? Often, but not always. Most fruit trees need to be pollinated with at least two or three compatible trees. This means if possible, you should plant a couple of trees to encourage pollination, giving them about 50-feet of space between the trees.

What should you not plant near an apple tree?

Read our guide on apple tree feeder roots and why you should always prevent grass from growing around the base of an apple tree, especially for young apple trees. Bulbed plants like garlic, onions and leeks, do a great job at repelling grass and weeds.

Do apple trees need a lot of water?

How Much Water Do Apple Trees Need? … In general, for an established tree, you won’t need to water it unless you are not getting much rain or there is a particularly dry spell or even drought. About an inch (2.5 cm.) or so of rainfall every week to ten days is adequate for most apple trees.

Are apple trees easy to grow?

Growing apple trees organically can be challenging. … Sadly, fruit trees also have a down side because they experience pest and disease problems, poor production, and nutrient deficiencies. And growing apple trees is notoriously difficult. When growing apple trees, there are so many potential problems to contend with.

Do I need 2 apple trees to get fruit?

Pollination and fertilization are necessary for fruit development. … Plant at least two different apple tree varieties within 50 feet of one another for good fruit set. Some apple varieties, such as Golden Delicious, will produce a crop without cross-pollination from a second variety.

What do you put around the base of a fruit tree?

Organic matter such as straw, hay, wood chips, ground bark, sawdust, leaves, grass clippings, and pine needles are common mulching materials. These should be applied to a depth of 2 to 6 inches and cover the ground around a plant out to the drip line. Black plastic is often used in vegetable production.

Can you plant strawberries under apple trees?

How can you tell if a apple tree is male or female?

If a tree is dioecious it only has male or female parts, not both. If a tree is male and contains flowers, then it has male flowers and produces pollen. Meanwhile, if a tree is female and contains flowers, then it has female flowers and produces fruit.

Will a pear tree pollinate an apple tree?

Apple and pear trees cannot cross pollinate one another because they are not part of the same species nor genus. Apples are in the genus Malus while pears are in the genus Pyrus.

Will 1 apple tree produce apples?

One tree is not enough

To set fruit, the vast majority of apple trees requires a different variety grown nearby for pollination. While some apple varieties are self-pollinating, even they produce more fruit with another variety nearby.

Do apple trees need mates?

Since most apple trees are not self-fruitful, meaning they cannot pollinate themselves, a partner in pollination is required, and the details of the exchange – including type of trees, time of bloom and distance apart – are critical.

Are we gaining or losing trees?

Today, annual tree harvest vs. production on a world-wide scale shows that humans cut down approximately 15 billion trees a year and re-plant about 5 billion.